How Frequently Should You Change Jobs?

Or should you even? Change jobs?

 
How Frequently Should You Change Jobs?
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There used to be a time when employees chose to stick to their jobs for decades. An average employee would retire from the very place they started working at. But the scene has completely changed since then. Switching jobs after jobs is a pretty normal practice in the professional world today. Whether or not this practice has been advantageous remains debatable! But like everything else, this too has its own benefits as well as drawbacks. From the current generation’s point of view, the benefits outweigh the drawbacks and hence, this generation is all affirmative about changing jobs. And yet, there remains a doubt that is still unanswered. Even if we consider changing jobs a good practice, how frequent should one change jobs in order to reap the maximum benefits?

Honestly, there is no one right answer to this question. It depends from person to person and case to case. But here are few pointers to help you make that decision.

Try To Keep Your Job For At Least 1-3 Years

Leaving a job just in a few months will give a bad impression to your next employer.
Leaving a job just in a few months will give a bad impression to your next employer.

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Do not make changing jobs a game. In order to reap proper benefits of the practice, you must be sincere and your conduct genuine. Like if you join a company, you should join with an intention of working there for at least a year. Working for one full year gives you ample amount of time to learn and understand the company, the industry, as well as your department’s nuances. If you do not garner valuable experience from the company you work at, your time there would turn out to be a waste.

On top of that, if your track record shows that you leave jobs within a year of joining, you will definitely not be the first choice of hiring officers. When you work in a particular field for 2 to 3 years, you become ready to move on to something new. Also, in order to peruse more senior positions, you first need to master your current one and that’d easily take 2-3 years.

While keeping the above suggestions in mind, you also need to remember that at times you might find yourself caught in a position where it is impossible to continue working at a particular job. This is exactly why I said that it all varies from case to case depending upon the circumstances in hand. But in any case, it is important to have good reasons for changing your job. If every job you switch makes an upward going graph in terms of position, salary, title etc; you are doing good.

Who Are You Loyal To?

It is only natural to move from one company to another, if there is opportunity for growth.
It is only natural to move from one company to another, if there is opportunity for growth.

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In the current scenario, you should only be loyal to yourself. The current work culture is such that the employers have accepted this practice of job change by employees. So much so, loyalty to the company doesn’t get rewarded anymore. Gone are the days when the company used to consider its employees as valuable assets. Today, employees are reduced to necessary cost to the balance sheet of the company. In such a scenario, it is only obvious and fair to look out for yourself instead of the company.

The current work culture is also quickly shifting towards the outside consultants and freelancers for work. The company doesn’t have to provide employment benefits to them and also gets the work done in less expense. Additionally, the existing workforce is also moving towards the culture of Flexible Workforce. These modern trends are only adding to the list of reasons why you should consider the practice of changing jobs.

The bottom-line is that you have to be very clever as well as cautious. You don’t want to be looked at as a “risky hire” and at the same time you don’t want to let go of brilliant opportunities. Find your balance!