Jagga Jasoos Music Review

Jagga Jasoos Music Review

Appreciating music is a relative concept. Any art cannot be judged and that applies to Bollywood music as well. After ADHM, Pritam and Amitabh Bhattacharya combine and we are on a roll. Let’s find out what’s here for us.

 

The album kicks off with Ullu Ka Pattha sung by Arijit Singh and Nikhita Gandhi. Starting with the Moroccan Flamenco arpeggios, this transcends into the familiar Bollywood territory. As depicted in the video, this talks about the fast moving heart in a faster moving journey across the oriental country.Worth a listen for sure.

The second song in the album is Galti Se Mistake. Manipuri tribal drums or inspired Mexican rap, depends on what your perspective is. The heart of the song is totally Desi. With the voices of Arijit Singh and Amit Mishra, Amitabh Bhattacharya wonderfully recreates the funny and waggish world of the teenage and adolescence. A peppy number.

Jhumritalaiyya, a Boss Nova riff combined with conventional soft-rock. Arijit Singh and Mohan Kanan (Agnee) nonchalantly tell the story of a first silly high school crush. Penned by Neelesh Mishra, the song is all about naivety of that first romance. Definitely one of those contextual tracks, which would be the highlight of the movie.

Phir wahi, the music video talks about the not so spoken father-son relationship. It does that with heartrending brute force which is induced by mellifluous vocals of Arijit. Pritam and Amitabh are at their bests here. The melancholy and mood of the song might make you recall a few broken relations from your past, and not just one type.

How do we talk about this musical adventure without ‘Musafir’? Tushar Joshi lends his voice and soul to the composition. Starting with minimal arrangements, the tempo increases slowly and grows on you Soft rock, with a beautiful guitar solo at the crescendo, and the song says the unsaid between the two lead characters of the movie. One of the highlights of the album for sure.

The final released song is Khana Khake. It’s unique, really unique.  Here one very critical message about life and death is delivered without sounding preachy even  for a second. This is rendered by an ensemble chorus consisting of Pritam and Amitabh Bhattacharya. The music consists of trumpets, drums and what not. This is a flamboyant number.

In a planet troubled by swag, scooters and selfies, the album provides a fresh monsoon break. This is green, glorious and unconventional, and surely is one of our picks for the month.

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